IGGCAS OpenIR  > 新生代地质与环境院重点实验室
Long-term trends in diatom diversity and palaeoproductivity: a 16 000-year multidecadal record from Lake Baikal, southern Siberia
Mackay, Anson W.1; Felde, Vivian A.2,3; Morley, David W.1; Piotrowska, Natalia4; Rioual, Patrick5; Seddon, Alistair W. R.2,3; Swann, George E. A.6
2022-02-28
Source PublicationCLIMATE OF THE PAST
ISSN1814-9324
Volume18Issue:2Pages:363-380
AbstractBiological diversity is inextricably linked to community stability and ecosystem functioning, but our understanding of these relationships in freshwater ecosystems is largely based on short-term observational, experimental, and modelling approaches. Using a multidecadal diatom record for the past ca. 16 000 years from Lake Baikal, we investigate how diversity and palaeoproductivity have responded to climate change during periods of both rapid climate fluctuation and relative climate stability. We show dynamic changes in diatom communities during the past 16 000 years, with decadal shifts in species dominance punctuating millennial-scale seasonal trends. We describe for the first time in Lake Baikal a gradual shift from spring to autumnal diatom communities that started during the Younger Dryas and peaked during the Late Holocene, which likely represents orbitally driven ecosystem responses to long-term changes in seasonality. Using a multivariate classification tree, we show that trends in planktonic and tychoplanktonic diatoms broadly reflect both long-term climatic changes associated with the demise of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and abrupt climatic changes associated with, for example, the Younger Dryas stadial. Indeed, diatom communities are most different before and after the boundary between the Early and Middle Holocene periods of ca. 8.2 cal kyr BP, associated with the presence and demise of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets respectively. Diatom richness and diversity, estimated using Hill's species numbers, are also shown to be very responsive to periods characterized by abrupt climate change, and using knowledge of diatom autecologies in Lake Baikal, diversity trends are interpreted in terms of resource availability. Using diatom biovolume accumulation rates (BVARs; mu m(3) cm(-2) yr(-1)), we show that spring diatom crops dominate palaeoproductivity for nearly all of our record, apart from a short period during the Late Holocene, when autumnal productivity dominated between 1.8-1.4 cal kyr BP. Palaeoproductivity was especially unstable during the Younger Dryas, reaching peak rates of 18.3 x 10(3) mu m(3) cm(-2) yr(-1) at ca. 12.3 cal kyr BP. Generalized additive models (GAMs), which explore productivity-diversity relationships (PDRs) during pre-defined climate periods, reveal complex relationships. The strongest statistical evidence for GAMs were found during the Younger Dryas, the Early Holocene, and the Late Holocene, i.e. periods of rapid climate change. We account for these differences in terms of climate-mediated resource availability, and the ability of endemic diatom species in Lake Baikal to adapt to extreme forms of living in this unique ecosystem. Our analyses offer insight into how productivity-diversity relationships may develop in the future under a warming climate.
DOI10.5194/cp-18-363-2022
Funding OrganizationEU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council
WOS KeywordPHOTOSYNTHETIC PIGMENTS ; ECOSYSTEM PRODUCTIVITY ; CLIMATE VARIABILITY ; SPECIES RICHNESS ; HIGH-RESOLUTION ; SURFACE SEDIMENTS ; HOLOCENE ; PHYTOPLANKTON ; BIODIVERSITY ; VEGETATION
Language英语
Funding ProjectEU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development[EVK2-CT-2000-0057] ; UK Natural Environment Research Council[NE/J010227/1] ; Norwegian Research Council[249894/F20]
Funding OrganizationEU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; EU Fifth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; UK Natural Environment Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council ; Norwegian Research Council
WOS Research AreaGeology ; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
WOS SubjectGeosciences, Multidisciplinary ; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences
WOS IDWOS:000765236300001
PublisherCOPERNICUS GESELLSCHAFT MBH
Citation statistics
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.iggcas.ac.cn/handle/132A11/104982
Collection新生代地质与环境院重点实验室
Corresponding AuthorMackay, Anson W.
Affiliation1.UCL, Environm Change Res Ctr, Dept Geog, London WC1E 6BT, England
2.Univ Bergen, Dept Biol Sci, POB 7803, N-5020 Bergen, Norway
3.Univ Bergen, Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, POB 7803, N-5020 Bergen, Norway
4.Silesian Tech Univ, Inst Phys CSE, Div Geochronol & Environm Isotopes, Konarskiego 22B, PL-44100 Gliwice, Poland
5.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Geol & Geophys, Key Lab Cenozo Geol & Environm, POB 9825, Beijing 100029, Peoples R China
6.Univ Nottingham, Sch Geog, Univ Pk, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Mackay, Anson W.,Felde, Vivian A.,Morley, David W.,et al. Long-term trends in diatom diversity and palaeoproductivity: a 16 000-year multidecadal record from Lake Baikal, southern Siberia[J]. CLIMATE OF THE PAST,2022,18(2):363-380.
APA Mackay, Anson W..,Felde, Vivian A..,Morley, David W..,Piotrowska, Natalia.,Rioual, Patrick.,...&Swann, George E. A..(2022).Long-term trends in diatom diversity and palaeoproductivity: a 16 000-year multidecadal record from Lake Baikal, southern Siberia.CLIMATE OF THE PAST,18(2),363-380.
MLA Mackay, Anson W.,et al."Long-term trends in diatom diversity and palaeoproductivity: a 16 000-year multidecadal record from Lake Baikal, southern Siberia".CLIMATE OF THE PAST 18.2(2022):363-380.
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